Display Your Outrage Over Mauna Kea Desecration

Use the image below as an icon or meme on social media to add to documentation that a “substantial segment of the public” is outraged about witnessing desecration of Mauna Kea. “Outrage” is an important part of the criteria for determining desecration has taken place as per Hawai’i State Law §711-1107 Desecration (see below).

You can also sign a special “Outrage” petition here, to help document the existence of this “substantial segment.”

I know. I know. You’d think that what’s happening this very day, and all the long days preceeding this day–through countless demonstrations of support, vigils and encampments, impassioned court case testimonies, documentary films, petitions, songs, statements, sign waving, blogs, letters of support, social media groups and so on–would have gotten this message of “outrage” through the noggins of the powers that be. But those noggins seem to be willfully, cruelly obtuse.

Outrage 101
July 23, 2019. Public Domain.

Even if this gambit has been tried and rejected in the past, now in 2019, the world is paying more attention to Mauna Kea and the Protectors than ever before. And social media has become an even more powerful purveyor of social change messages. Perhaps a simple graphic, such as the above, posted by thousands or hundreds of thousands of Kiai’ and allies, could add one more helpful way to provide irrefutable documentation that unlawful desecration exists with respect to Mauna Kea.

Take the above. Use it in whatever way will serve the cause of protecting Mauna Kea.


The State Law 

§711-1107 Desecration. (1) A person commits the offense of desecration if the person intentionally desecrates:
(a) Any public monument or structure;
(b) A place of worship or burial; or
(c) In a public place the national flag or any other object of veneration by a substantial segment of the public.
(2) “Desecrate” means defacing, damaging, polluting, or otherwise physically mistreating in a way that the defendant knows will outrage the sensibilities of persons likely to observe or discover the defendant’s action.
(3) Any person convicted of committing the offense of desecration shall be sentenced to a term of imprisonment of not more than one year, a fine of not more than $10,000, or both. [L 1972, c 9, pt of §1; gen ch 1993; am L 2002, c 198, §1]


#WeAreMaunaKea

 

 

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